MADE: 1960s style crochet twin set

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: 1960s style crochet twin set suit (handmade), retro saddle shoes (DIY), vintage white hoops (thrifted op-shop find)

Last year, I wrote a blog post about a few vintage inspired knitting and crochet projects that I was planning to embark on. After completing a 1950’s inspired polka dot sweater, I immediately started working on the next thing that was on my to-make list – this 1960’s inspired crochet twin set.

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstellaThe pattern for this crochet twin set is from Patons Book 1318 Vintage Charm: Archive patterns from the 40’s to the 70’s, a pattern booklet I purchased from Spotlight (Singapore). I was initially tempted to make an identical one using pink yarn that is similar to the one used in the book, but I couldn’t find anything suitable in Spotlight. Every pink ball of yarn I found in the shop was wool, and wool is icky for hot and humid Singapore. Fortunately, I was shopping with a friend and she persuaded me to pick this sunny pastel yellow acrylic instead. I know, acrylic ain’t the best substitute but where do I find cool cotton yarn in Singapore!?

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstellaFibre aside, this colour was a great recommendation! I am glad that I listened to my friend and didn’t submit to my 16 year old mini-me on the left shoulder that screams for anything in cotton pink.

This crochet twin set has turned out to be such a lovely addition to my capsule wardrobe for the months of March and April so far. Matching twin sets are the best for people (like me) who are trying to expand their vintage/vintage-inspired outfit repertoire without hurting the wallet, wardrobe, or world. *insert twin heart emoji*

Here’s how I have styled my crochet twin set:

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: 1960s style crochet blouse (handmade), second-hand vintage 90s does 60s mini-skirt (online purchase), vintage white purse (thrifted op-shop find), ballerina flats (ASOS), white hoop earrings (had them for as long as I can remember)

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: New York Herald Tribune T-shirt (DIY), 1960s style crochet skirt (handmade), retro style huaraches (ASOS), wicker tote (thrifted op-shop find), ice-cream necklace (handmade), cat-eye glasses (ASOS)

Hooray to a versatile capsule wardrobe. I can’t wait to wear these out more often! xx G

DIY: Jean Seberg’s New York Herald Tribune T-shirt

The New York Herald Tribune t-shirt is an iconic fashion piece that was worn by Jean Seberg in the movie “Breathless”. Since the release of the French New Wave movie in 1960, the t-shirt, like Seberg’s gamine pixie haircut, has gained a cult following and inspired many, including me. There’s something about the combination of a clean white shirt and classic typography that is very appealing. Ever since I got my haircut and watch the film, I wanted a t-shirt like that to wear for casual days out.

Apparently, Rodarte even released an almost identical design in 2010 to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the film’s release. I’m not sure how much that t-shirt by Rodarte costs and I’m not even going to try looking it up, because I made one myself easily.

And you can do it too, with a print-out of the New York Herald Tribune logo. Tip: Search on Google!

Jean Seberg Breathless T-shirt 1960s Vintage Retro DIY

Materials:

1x piece of freezer paper
1x penknife
1x plain white t-shirt
1x print out of the New York Herald Tribune (ideally full A4)
1x pot of black fabric paint
1x paint brush
Some washi tape

Steps:

 

1. Trace the logo on the side of the freezer paper without the smooth, shiny wax.

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion2. Cut out the letters on the freezer paper with a penknife. Some letters will be tricky, like “O” and “R”. You can choose to either cut the inner piece out and stick it on later (like my letter “O”) or cut the letters out like a stencil (like my letter “R”).

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion3. Iron the freezer paper on the t-shirt. Notice that the inner circle of my “o” is missing in this picture. I stuck in on later.

4. And now the fun part! Slap on the paint over the letters and make sure you got all the itty bitty corners covered.

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashionjean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion5. You may end up with some thin lines in each letter that don’t show up from your painting. Stick some wash tape to make sure you mark the boundaries and paint over with confidence!

6. Ta da! And it’s all done!

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion

MADE: Vintage 1950’s Style Polka Dot Sweater

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater
Many of you may not know this, but I started blogging eons ago when I picked up knitting. My first blog was called “because she started knitting”. Obviously, my focus has changed significantly since. But… my knitting skills pretty much stayed stagnant because I was never confident enough to move away from hats and scarves.

A while back I blogged about some vintage-inspired knitting and crochet books which spurred me to pick up my knitting needles once more. Fast forward many months later, this polka dot sweater is born.

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

Left: My creation // Right: The original pattern from the book Vintage Knits for Him & Her: 30 modern knitting patterns for stylish vintage knitwear

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

That’s 6 inches off the bottom!

It took me about 2 months to finish this project, and then a couple more months to grieve over the fact that it was too long for my liking. After a tearful post on Instagram, I finally mustered enough courage to snip the bottom off and to correct the length. I took off about 6 inches from the bottom! I honestly don’t know how I ended up making a dress. Maybe I shouldn’t have steamed it with a steam iron. But I love how yarn looks after a bit of steaming.

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

Front and back

And then, after the length was fixed, I realised that I wished it fitted on my body better. Once again, maybe.. maybe I really shouldn’t have steamed it, because steaming relaxes the yarn.

Vintage 1950s inspired polka dot sweater

It took me a few more months of grieving before I finally came into terms with the fact that I am NOT going to make it better. I am NOT taking the sides in. I have had enough. This project has exhausted all of my patience. And so, this is the way it stays. xo G

DIY/MUST-HAVE: Vintage-inspired Saddle Shoes

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

*This post is also featured as a guest post on Atomic Amber’s fabulous pin-up and vintage style blog.* >>> here!

Saddle shoes were very popular in the 1940s and 1950s, and are a must-have for anyone that loves mid-century fashion. Back in 2012, I made a pair of two-tone oxford brogues using bronze fabric paint. Now that I am slowly progressing towards a more vintage-inspired wardrobe, I find that I need a pair of black and white saddle shoes to supplement my wardrobe. And being me, I’d much rather make a pair myself than to buy a pair online.

So here’s a simple tutorial for everyone out there who wants to make a pair too!

Materials:

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

A pair of white plimsolls – I got mine from Target
A pot of black fabric paint
A paint brush with a flat or sharp tip for precision during painting
Black fabric marker
Sticky tape – I used wash tape I have in my stash

Steps:

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

1. Remove the shoe laces. Place sticky tape somewhere off the centre of the shoes. Also, tape the tongue of the shoe down so it doesn’t get in the way while you paint.

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

2. Use the black fabric marker to mark a semi-circle on the back of the shoes. I followed the stitching pattern that was already on the plimsolls.

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

3. Start painting away! Don’t be too worried about getting paint on the eyelets because you can wipe the paint off before it dries.

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

4. Wipe off any paint you have on the eyelets. You can also clean the insides using cotton buds.

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

5. Allow the paint to dry for a day, then set the paint with an iron. Avoid being too close to the rubber soles because you don’t want to melt the rubber!

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

6. Put the laces back on and smile, because you now own a pair of saddle shoes!

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

Wearing: Freddies of Pinewood Lana jeans and #gwenstellamade vintage-inspired saddle shoes

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

DIY Vintage Inspired Saddle Shoes

A couple of weekends ago, I wore my “new” saddle shoes for the very first time. I’m so excited about all the different ways I can incorporate it into my mid-century outfits in the future! Let me know if you make a pair for yourself too. I’d love to see your projects! x G

 

MADE: Vintage 1960’s inspired Chocolate Chip Christmas Hat

vintage 1960s inspired knitted hatvintage 1960s inspired knitted hatHappy New Year everyone! I hope everyone had a good Christmas and New Year’s. I was away for the entire month of December as I had been busy with my work and life in general. More importantly, I spent Christmas with my boyfriend in Texas and got to meet his family and friends for the first time!

And because it was winter, I got to wear all the coats and hats and boots and everything that I haven’t had the chance to wear since I moved back to Singapore 3 years ago. But I still couldn’t resist knitting something new.. especially since I still have so many balls of yarn in my stash!

Bernat 1969 hat knitting patternBernat 1969 hat knitting pattern

I saw this photo of a vintage 1969 knitted hat featured in an old Bernat knitting pattern magazine and I was smitten! The hat looked like it was made with a bulky yarn in the photo, but I wanted to use my existing DK / 8 ply yarn, so I decided to improvise! I used this gnome hat pattern that I found via Ravelry as a base for my hat.

vintage 1960s inspired knitted hatAnd to replicate the original 1969 hat pattern, I made the following modifications:

  • Created the long tail by repeating a few of the decreasing rounds a couple of times
  • Adding a pom pom at the end with fabric glue

vintage 1960s inspired knitted hatvintage 1960s inspired knitted hat

vintage 1960s inspired knitted hatEasy peasy! And is it just me or does the yarn remind you of chocolate chip and vanilla ice cream? Yum.

And now that I am back in hot and sunny Singapore, this hat shall rest in the wardrobe… until my next adventure to somewhere cool…

MADE: Turban Knot Headband

I made this red headband a while ago based on this item that I saw on ASOS. The ASOS website always provides me with endless inspirations for creating fashion-forward knitted projects. If I were crazy, I’d make one in every colour of yarn I have. 

DIY Inspiration: Very 70s 
(via)



***


Materials:
1 ball of 8ply yarn of your choice
A pair of 3.00mm knitting needles


Pattern:


Cast on 27 stitches
Row 1k2, *p1, k1; rep from *, end k1
Row 2: k1, *k next st in the row below, k1; rep from *
Row 3: k1, *p1, k1; rep from *
Row 4: k2, *k next st in the row below; rep from *, end k1 



Repeat Rows 1 – 4 until the headband measures approximately 70cm long. 

Before casting off, tie a knot at the centre of the work and then wrap the headband around your head to check that it fits well. Once you’re satisfied with the length, cast off.

Bind seams. 


***


Enjoy! 

MADE: Knitted Sequined Collar

Right side
Wrong side

It’s here, it’s here!!! The pattern for my latest knitted creation is finally here:

THE KNITTED SEQUINED COLLAR 



Yarn: 1 ball of Moda Vera Ballroom yarn
Needles: 5.0mm
Gauge: I do not make swatches


Pattern:
(Please read the pattern very carefully before casting on! This is not a conventional written knitting pattern. If possible, try knitting the pattern using another yarn of a similar weight first. Believe me, frogging sequined yarn is a real pain in the arse.)

The picture above represents the knitted collar. 

The numbers represents the number of stitches and the lines represents where markers should be placed. For example, count 2 stitches from the beginning and place a marker.
The dots represents where a decrease should be made. For example, decreases should always be made AFTER the stitch marker on the left of the collar and BEFORE the stitch marker on the right of the collar. One dot represents 1 decrease and each decrease should be made as follows:

LEFT of the pattern: sl1, knit 1, psso
RIGHT of the pattern: knit, return, pass, return


Video examples of these decreases can be found here.

Summary: 
1 x Line = 1 x stitch marker
1 x Dot = 1 x decrease
1 x decrease on the left of the pattern = sl1, knit 1, psso
1 x decrease on the right of the pattern = knit, return, pass, return
Not all decreases occur at the same time, so read the pattern carefully! Ready? Here we go!
Cast on 180
Place stitch markers
Row 1 – 4: Knit
Row 5: Purl
Row 6: Knit all and decrease the RED dots.
Row 7: Purl
Repeat Rows 6 & 7 until the collar measures 5 cm from the beginning. End this repeat pattern with a purl row (i.e. Row 7)
Row 8: Knit all and decrease the RED BLUE dots
Row 9: Purl
Repeat Rows 8 & 9 until the collar measures 6.5 cm from the beginning. End this repeat pattern with a purl row (i.e. Row 8)
Row 10: Knit all and decrease the RED, BLUE GREEN dots
Row 11: Purl
Repeat Rows 10 & 11 until the collar fits your neck. I stopped when my collar measured 9cm from the beginning, but my neck is probably different from yours!
Cast off loosely. I used the cast off technique shown in this video
It is important that your cast off is loose! If not, the collar will fit very tightly around your neck!

Push all the sequins at the back to the front.
Block by pinning it in place and then hovering a steam iron over it for several minutes
Sew hooks.
You’re done! (n_n)

DIY: Refashioned Straw Bag

Dear Summer, I miss you so much. Winter has been cold and dreary. I want you back.

I guess you can tell how much I am missing summer right now. I could go crazy trying to keep warm in this cold and thinking about all the fun I had last summer. In preparation for Summer 2011, I made a refashioned straw bag! Whoopieee! I have always been inspired by Japanese fashion and this straw bag is a perfect example of its influences on me. Here are some of the pieces that inspired me:
(via)
(via)
I bought my mini straw bag from a thrift shop for just $4 over a year ago with the thought of making it look better, and finally got around to refashioning it this year. Do you like it? You can make a similar one following the steps below, or Google ‘japanese straw bag’ for more inspiration.
Materials:
Straw bag
Bits of different lace trimmings and ribbons
Glue gun
Steps: 

1. Use glue gun to glue a thick, ‘holey’ lace all around the middle of the straw bag. 

2. Use glue gun to glue another lace fabric slightly above the lace used in the previous step. 

3. Tie ribbons and glue them wherever you like. 

4. Add extra trimmings around the bag if you like.
I only used white trimmings for my lace bag because I didn’t want the trimmings to overwhelm the entire bag. Also, I was awfully scared of not being able to carry off such a feminine-looking bag. 

So, here you are, a very short and simple tutorial for the summer. I can’t wait to use this bag when summer comes!