SEWN: REFASH! A collaboration with Swapaholic


A couple of months ago, Swapaholic got in touch with me with the exciting opportunity to collaborate for their “Reimagine” swap party in July 2019. They sent me a bag of second-hand clothes collected from previous swaps, and my only brief was to embark on 3 different refashion transformations. Well, what a treat!

Some of the clothes were damaged and rejected for swaps, while some of them were still in good condition but somehow not picked up in the previous swaps. Regardless of the condition, I was in love with the choice of colours and fabrics that the second-hand pieces provided. You know me – I’m always ready to turn something old into something new again!

 

REFASHION #1: 1950’s style gingham set

The pick
I decided to use this gingham blouse for one of the refashion projects because .. gingham, duh. Well ok, not just that. This blouse is a great choice for a refashion project because the design of the blouse (with the extra large ruffle along the neckline and the long sleeves in particular) and its larger size mean that I will have ample yardage to play with for creating something new.
The idea
I knew I would have enough fabric for a separate top and bottom. To make things easy for me, I decided to make a simple skirt with an elasticised waist. The embroidered flowers were a design feature I wanted to keep in the final garment, so I decided to make a simple gathered skirt with the embroidered flowers along the bottom hem of the skirt. Other than sewing the sides together, sewing an elastic casing and inserting the elastic, I didn’t have to do much to make the skirt.

 

For the top, I decided to make a tube top using shirring elastic because shirred tops seem to be so “on trend” these days. They keep popping up on my feed! Anyway, I have been meaning to try to use shirring elastic so I thought this would be a great opportunity for me to start.

 

With the remaining pieces of fabric I had, I decided to make a long strip of fabric that can be used in many different ways. In my photos, you will see me using it as: 1) a headscarf, 2) a faux top for a vintage-inspired halter look, 3) a “belt”. I’m always thinking about outfit yield when it comes to sewing! I’m sure there are more ways I can wear the scarf so keep your eyes peeled, I might end up with 10 (or even more) looks by the end of the year.
But for now, I can already think of 7 different ways I can wear this refashion project and I think that’s pretty rad.
The final garment
And these are the final looks!

Wearing: handmade necklace, refashioned shirred tube top, refashioned skirt

 

Wearing: refashioned top and scarf for faux halter look, refashioned skirt, thrifted earrings

 

Wearing: high street earrings, refashioned shirred tube top, vintage Wranglers jeans

 

Wearing: refashioned headscarf, me-made white bustier top, vintage Wrangler jeans

 

Wearing: refashioned shirred tube top, refashioned scarf as belt, refashioned skirt, second-hand basket, earrings from a clothes swap with Swapaholic

 

Wearing: refashioned shirred tube top, refashioned skirt, refashioned headscarf tied in a bow, thrifted earrings, Tahitian kukui necklace

 

Wearing: me-made white bustier top, elastic belt (that I had since I was a teen), vintage bracelet, refashioned skirt

 

REFASHION #2: The cha-cha skirt

The pick
Another type of garment that is great for a refashion project is a maxi dress or maxi skirt. Similar to a larger garment, the added length of a maxi dress or skirt can provide additional yardage for refashioning. When I saw these 2 bright dresses, I knew they were perfect for my next refashion transformation. The bright orange and dramatic fuchsia just seem to go so well together! Also, the fuchsia dress came with a lining in the same fabulous colour, which meant that I really had a lot of yardage to work with for this refashion project.

 

The idea
 When it comes to thinking about how to execute a refashion project, I often try to make the sewing as simple as possible. The idea of cutting the dresses up into long strips of rectangles, then joining them up to make ruffles just came to me immediately. Also, because the colours of these dresses are so vibrant, I wanted to use that to my advantage and create a final garment with a design that is as eye-catching as these colours. And so, I made a tiered ruffle skirt with alternating colours for each layer that is reminiscent of the style of a cha-cha skirt.

 

The final garment
And now, here are some photos of the skirt in action!

Wearing: me-made white bustier top, belt (that I had since I was a teen), vintage bracelet


 

REFASHION #3: The basic pencil skirt


The pick
This oversized grey jersey dress became a natural candidate for my next project because of its colour and its material. Jersey knits are great to work with for a refashion project because the stretch it has offers more room for error in the cutting and fitting of the final garment.

 

The idea
Again, I’m all about thinking simply when it comes to refashioning. The idea of making a semi-fitted pencil skirt with an elasticised waist came to me because I wanted a skirt with a classic silhouette and neutral colour to add to my wardrobe. To make this skirt, all I did was chop the length of the dress off, sew an elastic casing, insert the elastic casing, and taper the width of the skirt as needed with straight stitches lengthwise. This refashion project was completed in less than 30 minutes!

 

The final garment
Here’s how the pencil skirt looks in action. I am pairing it with a cut-up t-shirt that I was actually wearing at home on the day that I was sewing this. They happen to pair nicely so I figured I would just style the skirt with the top for a “street fashion” look.

And there you have it, all 3 refashion projects that I did recently in collaboration with Swapaholic. If you’re located in Singapore, love fashion and want to be more sustainable, why not consider swapping instead of shopping? Swapaholic hosts regular swap parties at various parts of Singapore and they always have a great selection of styles! The next swap will be held on 7th September at Marina Barrage. Keep your eyes peeled on my posts on Instagram because I will be sharing a code for sign-up on Monday (29th July).
I hope you have enjoyed reading about my creative thought process behind these refashion projects. Which one is your favourite?

MADE: Etive Romper

From the moment my friend told me she was pregnant, I knew that I wanted to make a special handmade gift for her baby. Since I’m open to sewing, knitting and crocheting anything, my head was buzzing with 1001 different gift ideas for the baby (e.g., bunting for the room, mobile for the cot, pillow for the bed etc). But when I saw the cute versions of the Etive Romper that Christina (@gussetsandgodets) made on Instagram, I knew I wanted to knit the same romper for the yet-to-be born baby boy.

This is my first time knitting something for a little bub, and the romper sure is a quick and satisfying knit! The pattern is short and easy to follow, with lots of potential for easy modifications like the ones Christina (@gussetsandgodets) made. I was originally planning on taking it slow and completing it in February, which is around the time that the baby boy would be due. However, an unexpected baby shower came about and I decided to crank up my knitting speed. I casted on and started knitting the gauge only in the beginning of January, but was done the night before the baby shower in the middle of the month.

back view

leg cuff

I made this romper according to the pattern for the 0-3 month size range using the Jeans® yarn in Classic (by Lion Brand Yarn). The yarn is such a joy to knit with and has turned out looking so beautiful! Faux denim or faux shibori? You decide. Either way, it’s definitely a basic yet stylish look for a baby 😉

__________________________________________
Details:

Pattern: Etive Romper by Rainer and Bear (available here)
Yarn: Jeans® by Lion Brand Yarn via Spotlight Stores (Singapore)
Needles: 4.00mm, 3.25mm (as per pattern)


P.S.: My friend is due in February and I can’t wait to see how her baby boy looks in the the romper!

SEWN: Refashioned 1970’s Inspired Midnight Bohemian Skirt

I am going to start by making it clear that this is not a style I usually go for. But when I found out about the #SewFrosting Challenge organised by Heather Lou (of @closetcasepatterns) and Kelli (of @truebias), I knew I had to make this.

This sad, oversized vintage 1970’s dress had been sitting in my wardrobe for the longest time since I got it. (Why and how I got it, I can never recall or imagine) I love the print of the fabric and the soft, slinky feel of the polyester, and I knew I could alter it easily to fit myself, but I also didn’t think I would enjoy it in its very form – a midi length, long-sleeved dress with a pussybow.

Obviously, sending this to the donation bin is like a death sentence for the dress (and the fabric). Who would save a dress like this except for someone crazy like me? So, I did what I had to do – I butchered it and then stitched it together again.

I wanted to stay true to the era (i.e. 1970s), so I decided on the following 2 key design elements:

  • bias drape
  • ruffles

The result? A skirt that is 1 part goth, 1 part bohemian, and 100% ready for disco-dancing. Here’s how the magic happened:

  1. Unpicked stitches for sleeves and pussy bow collar
  2. Unpicked stitches for skirt
  3. Cut skirt the following ways (while checking that the final measurements will fit around my hips and knees):
    • sloping from back to front along the waist (so that the front will end up shorter than the back, and for that faux bias drape)
    • sloping from top to bottom (so that the width around the knees will end up narrow than the hips)
  4. Stitched along dotted line
  5. Folded down and stitched along the dotted line to create an elastic casing. Insert elastic.
  6. Cut sleeves to get rectangular pieces
  7. Aligned rectangular pieces as such and stitched them together to get a long strip of fabric. (This photo shows 4 rectangular pieces – 2 from each sleeve. I ended up getting 2 more rectangular pieces of the same measurements from the fabric from the bodice of the dress.)
  8. Gathered the long strip of fabric and stitched it along the hem of the skirt
  9. Stitched the unpicked seam of the pussybow collar to get a belt

This project was so fun to make and I loved doing something different on a whim. Anyone else here taking part in #SewFrosting as well?

I had been in a weird funk with my sewing since making my wedding dress and I think I finally got my sewjo back with an unusual sewing project like this one! No patterns, no regrets – just all about having fun! xx

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MADE: Knitted Beauty School Tops in Baby Pink and Powder Blue

Earlier this year, I test-knitted the Beauty School Top and matching Beauty School Turban patterns for Amy Appel (@poisongrrls). It was not my first time test knitting for Amy but these patterns turned out to be my favourite designs by her so far.

The sweater has a basic design that is full of possibilities and has an amazing fit for a 1950’s style silhouette. It’s a definite staple for any handmade vintage style loving lady.

When I did the test knitting, I chose a cotton blend yarn in baby pink because I wanted a colour that would go with my Country Garden skirt and Country Garden dress, and a fibre that would be suitable for this tropical climate. When I did a swatch of the yarn, I felt that the yarn seemed to be like lighter than the fingering weight that the pattern called for, so I ended up having to use small needles (i.e. 3.00mm instead of 3.25mm). To ensure a safer fit, I also decided to add stitches to the circumference of the sweater.

The sweater turned out to be such a dream, I wanted to make another one in a different colour. So, I decided to make one in powder blue as a birthday present for my friend!

As I am practically incapable of making the SAME thing twice within the same year, I decided to change it up and made some modifications to the pattern the second time round. Also, my tension seemed to have loosened up a little this time round so I used the required 3.25mm needles. Moral of the story: swatching is important and test-knitting is fun but stressful.

Can you spot the differences?

At a glance…

Project link on Ravelry: Baby Pink version & Powder Blue version
Pattern:
 Beauty School Top by Amy Appel (aka @poisongrrls) [link]

BABY PINK VERSION
Yarn: Hamanaka Sea Queen Shine Cotton “Lamé” in baby pink (with shiny metallic strand)

Modifications:

  • Needles: Used 3.00mm needles instead of 3.25mm to make the stitches denser
  • Chest size: Sneaked in 4 stitches in total across the chest (2 at the front and 2 at the back when casting on extra stitches to join the shoulders pieces) as I was aware that cotton could have less stretch
  • Length: Added 10 more rounds of knitting at the bottom to make the sweater longer

POWDER BLUE VERSION
Yarn: Hamanaka Sea Queen Shine Cotton in powder blue (aka no metallic strand)

Modifications:

  • Sleeves: 12 rounds of ribbing instead of 6
  • Neckband: 5 rounds ribbing with smaller needles, 5 rounds ribbing with larger needles

Obviously, I am wearing my good bra in these photos to achieve the 1950’s style silhouette. These sweaters are sure snug! For anyone who is not a fan of snug, cropped tops, I will suggested making it wider by casting on more stitches when joining the back and front together, and longer by knitting more rounds between each decrease from bust through the waist to the hem.

Do you have this pattern on your queue or have you also made one? Let me know what you think about my pastel versions of the Beauty School Top!  xx

MADE: Knitted Silk Camisole

As I move towards having a 100% thrifted, vintage and me-made wardrobe, I have been wanting to knit a simple, sleeveless camisole for casual, everyday wear. Well, it’s summer every day here in Singapore!

Of course, anything too plain would be too boring for me. So, something has to pop – either the yarn or the pattern has to have a bit of *jazz*. Fortunately for me, this little project ended up to be a little bit of both.

I made this basic tank top using a free Japanese knitting pattern by Pierrot Yarns (a Japanese company) found via Ravelry, with some modifications to the neckline and sleeve opening for an extra feminine touch. If you look again, you will also notice the twisted rib stitch. They give such an interesting visual effect and add so much texture to the final product. Spending time twisting the stitches when knitting it was totally worth it!

The yarn is from a Japanese brand called Hamanaka, and this yarn is called Excel Silk. There’s a stash entry of it on Ravelry and it’s claimed to be 100% waterproof. To be honest, I have no idea what that really means. So… it doesn’t get wet? Anyway, I don’t think I will be washing it very often. The material feels cool to the skin and the stitches stretch out when I wear it.

I barely sweat in it. I’m just gonna wear, hang, air/sun, and repeat!

I am also in love with the super soft shade of pink that blends in so well with my skin. I feel like I could just melt into one of the impressionist paintings of the French countryside by Monet. So, don’t be too surprised if you see this camisole rotating into my basic weekend wear on Instagram. x

At a glance…

Project link on Ravelry: here
Pattern:
 216ss-02 Knit Bustier by Pierrot (Gosyo Co., Ltd) [link]
Yarn: Hamanaka Excel Silk in pink
Modifications: CO 113 (instead of 115), add sc all around the armholes and neckline, then with 3ch between each sc the second round.

P.S.: I still have a few balls of this yarn available, enough to make a matching bottom. I’m thinking about making a knitted pencil skirt with the same twisted rib stitch! What do you think?

MADE: 1950’s Bardot-inspired Bright Red Sweater

Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater
Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater

(via)

The inspiration behind the sweater

Brigitte Bardot has always been my muse. I love her iconic woke-up-like-this hair and sense of style. When I am in need of some cute and flirty 1950’s vintage style inspirations, I always turn to Pinterest and enter “Brigitte Bardot style” in the search bar.

This picture of Bardot with her wide bambi eyes, alluring lips, unbrushed look and bright red sweater is something that caught my eye a while back. I have always wanted to have a red sweater like that.

Obviously, with a design that simple, I could always just find a similar one from a high-street store. But why would I want to do that when I know that I could make my own?

Finding the pattern

When I came across the Knitting It Old School book in a secondhand bookstore in San Francisco in 2016 and saw the pattern “Swing Time” by Kirsten Kapur, I knew I had found the right pattern. It has just the right design details: round neckline, ribbing in the body, short sleeves.

Unfortunately (and rather unsurprisingly), the smallest size offered by the pattern is for a 32″ bust. I *could* have a 32″ bust if I wore a good bra and kept my chest out all the time. But ain’t nobody’s got time for that.

I have always wanted to try grading a knitting pattern. I have graded many sewing patterns but grading knitting patterns just seems like swimming in dark waters to me. Unpicking sewing stitches is less painful than frogging a whole knitted sweater!

After reading this article from the archives of the online Knitty magazine, I decided to jump in and take a swim. Moreover, I have a ton of vintage knitting patterns that I would LOVE to knit but aren’t my size. I just have to try grading a pattern at some point.

Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater
Bardot Inspired Knitted Red SweaterFinding the yarn

The next problem I faced was finding the right yarn for the project. I have knitted a fair share of projects using cheap acrylic yarn that I have bought and hoarded over the years from the time I was a poor university student. As I am starting to become more concerned about the amount of plastic amassing in landfills and floating in the ocean on planet Earth, I wanted to make the switch to using natural fibres. Living in the tropical island of Singapore where summer happens ALL YEAR ROUND makes using cotton the obvious choice. I bought my cotton yarn via a shop on Taobao.com (which is basically Chinese Amazon). The name of this stunning shade of red is, believe it or not, called “China Red” (when directly translated from Chinese).

I absolutely love this yarn! It’s a cotton blend that consists of 60% cotton and 40% milk fibre. It’s soft and easy to knit with. I have worn the sweater a couple of times and it seems to be holding up pretty well so far. Well, you can ask me again in a few months’ time!

Grading the pattern

So, for anyone who is interested, here’s how I graded my pattern:

I made a gauge and studied the different sizes of the pattern. This pattern is written for S (M, L etc) – 32 (36, 40 etc)” chest. I wanted a 30″ chest (so kinda like an XS). That means that it is 2″ smaller than the smallest size.

The difference between XS and S is 2″, while the difference between S and M is 4″.

So, when the pattern asked to CO 98 (110, 122 etc), I decided to CO 92 for my XS sweater.

110 (size M) – 98 (size S) = 12

Difference between XS and S = 0.5 x difference between S and M = 0.5 x 12 = 6

Number of stitches to CO for size XS = size S – 6sts = 98 – 6 = 92

I applied the same concept throughout for the number of stitches required and the length of certain parts that were stated.

Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater
Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater

Details: Gold-tone buttons saved from a vintage dress I changed the buttons for

The end result

I guess… it worked? The only other modification I made is reducing the length of ribbing for the sleeves so I won’t have the weird thick sleeve cuffs folded over and it would look more like the sweater that Bardot has. My sweater has a snug fit, which is what I want and need for the vintage look. Can you imagine what it would have looked like if I hadn’t graded the pattern!?

The original pattern describes the sweater to be a 1940’s style design. For some reason, knitting it in red made it look more like a 1950’s style highschool cheerleader sweater of some sort. Don’t you think so?

Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater

Showing you the seams under the pits!

Bardot Inspired Knitted Red Sweater

A video of how I did my hair is also available on my Instagram. Photo edited with A Colour Story Stardust filter pack by Keiko Lynn.

Summary:

Pattern: Swing Time by Kirsten Kapur (from Knitting It Old School)

Yarn: Basic cotton red yarn from TaoBao.com

Modifications: Reduced length of ribbing for sleeve cuffs, graded pattern to fit XS

MAKE DO & MEND: Pom Pom Heels

gwenstella made pom pom heels DIY

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY
A lot of people have asked me about my heels from the last blog post on my new Gwenstella Made 1950’s Style Country Garden Dress. I have been keeping quiet about it because it’s a DIY project that I have been meaning to share! I have had this pair of pink mid heels for a good 3 years or so and they have turned kinda filthy. When I say filthy, I mean.. really filthy…

The faux suede surface is scratched in many different areas, the soles have worn off, and the interior is slowly peeling away. It is tempting to simply chuck them away and get a new pair. But there’s still so much wearable lifespan to them and I hate to send them to the landfill so soon. Really, it’s still overall a very structurally-sound pair of heels. And so, obviously, I had to make do and mend!

gwenstella made pom pom heels DIY
I was inspired by a few different pom pom heels I have seen online, and I knew adding pom poms would be a super quick and easy way to make my heels cute again. This took me less than 30 minutes from start to the end. Here’s how I did it:

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIYMaterials:

  • A pair of heels
  • Foam soles
  • Yarn
  • Pom pom maker
  • Hot glue gun
  • Felt
  • Scissors

Steps:

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY1. Trim foam soles to fit the soles of the heels. Glue them in place.

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY
gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY2. Make 2 pom poms. Trim them and make sure they look almost identical.

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY3. Flatten a side of each pom pom and glue a small piece of round felt on the flattened side.

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY4. Play around with the position of the pom pom on the heels. This is important as you want to make sure you get the right spot before securing it with hot glue gun. When you think you’re ready, secure the pom poms on the shoes using hot glue gun!

gwenstellamade pom pom heels DIY

I am so happy with how this DIY project turned out! This is also a great stash busting project for anyone who has too much yarn lying around, like me. I have a few other pom pom projects lined up for the blog. If you like pom poms as much as I do, you can look forward to seeing here! xx

MADE: 1960s style crochet twin set

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: 1960s style crochet twin set suit (handmade), retro saddle shoes (DIY), vintage white hoops (thrifted op-shop find)

Last year, I wrote a blog post about a few vintage inspired knitting and crochet projects that I was planning to embark on. After completing a 1950’s inspired polka dot sweater, I immediately started working on the next thing that was on my to-make list – this 1960’s inspired crochet twin set.

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstellaThe pattern for this crochet twin set is from Patons Book 1318 Vintage Charm: Archive patterns from the 40’s to the 70’s, a pattern booklet I purchased from Spotlight (Singapore). I was initially tempted to make an identical one using pink yarn that is similar to the one used in the book, but I couldn’t find anything suitable in Spotlight. Every pink ball of yarn I found in the shop was wool, and wool is icky for hot and humid Singapore. Fortunately, I was shopping with a friend and she persuaded me to pick this sunny pastel yellow acrylic instead. I know, acrylic ain’t the best substitute but where do I find cool cotton yarn in Singapore!?

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstellaFibre aside, this colour was a great recommendation! I am glad that I listened to my friend and didn’t submit to my 16 year old mini-me on the left shoulder that screams for anything in cotton pink.

This crochet twin set has turned out to be such a lovely addition to my capsule wardrobe for the months of March and April so far. Matching twin sets are the best for people (like me) who are trying to expand their vintage/vintage-inspired outfit repertoire without hurting the wallet, wardrobe, or world. *insert twin heart emoji*

Here’s how I have styled my crochet twin set:

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: 1960s style crochet blouse (handmade), second-hand vintage 90s does 60s mini-skirt (online purchase), vintage white purse (thrifted op-shop find), ballerina flats (ASOS), white hoop earrings (had them for as long as I can remember)

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

vintage retro 1960s crochet twin set suit handmade outfit fashion gwenstella

Wearing: New York Herald Tribune T-shirt (DIY), 1960s style crochet skirt (handmade), retro style huaraches (ASOS), wicker tote (thrifted op-shop find), ice-cream necklace (handmade), cat-eye glasses (ASOS)

Hooray to a versatile capsule wardrobe. I can’t wait to wear these out more often! xx G

DIY: Jean Seberg’s New York Herald Tribune T-shirt

The New York Herald Tribune t-shirt is an iconic fashion piece that was worn by Jean Seberg in the movie “Breathless”. Since the release of the French New Wave movie in 1960, the t-shirt, like Seberg’s gamine pixie haircut, has gained a cult following and inspired many, including me. There’s something about the combination of a clean white shirt and classic typography that is very appealing. Ever since I got my haircut and watch the film, I wanted a t-shirt like that to wear for casual days out.

Apparently, Rodarte even released an almost identical design in 2010 to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the film’s release. I’m not sure how much that t-shirt by Rodarte costs and I’m not even going to try looking it up, because I made one myself easily.

And you can do it too, with a print-out of the New York Herald Tribune logo. Tip: Search on Google!

Jean Seberg Breathless T-shirt 1960s Vintage Retro DIY

Materials:

1x piece of freezer paper
1x penknife
1x plain white t-shirt
1x print out of the New York Herald Tribune (ideally full A4)
1x pot of black fabric paint
1x paint brush
Some washi tape

Steps:

 

1. Trace the logo on the side of the freezer paper without the smooth, shiny wax.

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion2. Cut out the letters on the freezer paper with a penknife. Some letters will be tricky, like “O” and “R”. You can choose to either cut the inner piece out and stick it on later (like my letter “O”) or cut the letters out like a stencil (like my letter “R”).

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion3. Iron the freezer paper on the t-shirt. Notice that the inner circle of my “o” is missing in this picture. I stuck in on later.

4. And now the fun part! Slap on the paint over the letters and make sure you got all the itty bitty corners covered.

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashionjean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion5. You may end up with some thin lines in each letter that don’t show up from your painting. Stick some wash tape to make sure you mark the boundaries and paint over with confidence!

6. Ta da! And it’s all done!

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion

jean seberg new york herald tribune t-shirt DIY 1960s fashion

MAKE DO & MEND: 1970’s Inspired Pastel Bohemian

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

As I bravely declared in one of my Instagram posts, one of my goals for 2016 is to work on more sewing projects. This includes altering a garment so it works better for my body and my current style, as well as dressmaking projects.

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

This is an alteration project that I completed quickly in 2 nights earlier in January. Silly me, I got into the project so quickly I didn’t take a proper photo of it before the alteration. This 1970s pastel peasant dress is one of the vintage pieces that came with a vintage lot I bidded and won on eBay. It was too large for me and the original band around the top was losing its elasticity so I decided to unpick the stitches and reinsert new elastic bands.

The waist also came with a tiny and frail elastic thread that wasn’t really doing its job anymore, so I also took that out and put in a thicker elastic band around it. I am pretty proud of how neat the gathers around the waist turned out!

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Left: The altered dress on the mannequin
Right: Close-up of the gathers of the waist on the right side

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Left: Close-up of the bodice
Right: Close-up of the top band with elastic inserted on the inside

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Thick elastic band on the waistline on the wrong side of the garment. I’ve taken a bit of the sides in after sewing the elastic band… bad planning…

Unfortunately, I miscalculated the width of the waist and the dress turned out a little baggy even after inserting the elastic band. I fixed that by taking in the sides a little. No way am I going to unpick all 3 rows of stitches in the thick elastic band! I know that sounds awfully lazy, but I swear I do more unpicking with dressmaking projects when something goes wrong.

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

I know it looks better on the mannequin, probably because the mannequin has a bigger bust than I do…. Yes yes yes, on hindsight, I probably should have measured the width of my chest and width of the top of this dress, and altered the sides accordingly.

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Make Do Mend Vintage 1970s Pastel Peasant Dress

Experimenting with elastics in this project was fun and I am pretty happy with the way it looks on me right now. Pop on a large sunhat and coordinating accessories, and I am ready for a lazy Sunday afternoon in the park.

xx G

 


Wearing: Vintage 1970s babydoll peasant dress (eBay), white sunhat (Target Australia), white clip-ons (thrifted), white necklace (nondescript shop in Sydney), vintage white purse (thrifted), retro square sunnies (ASOS), vintage-inspired huaraches (ASOS) 


More Make Do and Mend projects on the blog right here